banugoshasp
  • Saraquill

    Reading this reminds me of Marjane Satrapi’s graduate art school project, a theme park of all the heroines/heroes of Iranian mythology. Too bad she wasn’t to turn it into a real park, it would have been cool to see what Banu Goshap’s ride or show would be.

  • Anonymous

    The whole Viking thing sounds familiar. I remember that there was a princess who was a Viking who ran away, dressed up as a man and joined a Viking ship so she could marry the captain. I don’t quite remember her name.

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  • Marjolijn

    Jason, I’m really chuffed that you have included my heroine in your gallery of princesses! Thank you for appreciating this little jewel of Persian folklore, to which I dedicated a snippet of my doctoral research. (See, the Citations to this page.) I just have two minor comments: firstly, in the (written) versions that I know of the story of Banu Goshasp’s marriage – but this is a popular story, and will have been told in many variant versions amongst the Persian speaking people – she overpowers her new husband Giv not repeatedly, but only once (and leaves him overnight tied up under the bed, not in the closet), before she is smooth-talked by her father Rostam into accepting her newlywed situation (and the sexual advances of her husband) as a good girl should. (The couple has just one child – so this might serve as an indication of how often afterwards she allows Giv to have his way with her!) Secondly, I would imagine her work of embroidery to consist of just her own, stunning, portrait – knocking all her suitors senseless with desire, before she knocks them out in person with her fighting skills when they each in turn come to claim her as their wife. But that’s animation licence for you, I suppose, and I do appreciate Jason’s take on Banu Goshasp’s portrayal of her self-glory.

  • Oh holy crap! I was trying to find an email for you for the longest time to ask questions like that! I’m so glad you got in touch. I spent forever trying to track down an English version of the Banugoshaspnameh and your work was the closest thing available! I’d like to get more Persian figures on the site – I’d love to pick your brain for ideas.

  • Jackal

    This reminds me of another story, where a girl and like, forty others are supposed to be given to some guy, and she’s like, ‘let us bathe first’ and then everyone takes a dump in her tub and leaves, and that’s just the beginning. Can’t remember the heroine’s name, though.