• drbdn

    I won’t lie, I watched Netflix’s new Marco Polo series just out of the hope that Khutulun might show up. Was pretty disappointed, though not terribly surprised, when she finally appeared in the 3rd episode.

  • Desmond M.

    cool that she’s in there

  • drbdn

    Sorry, I didn’t mean to imply that I was disappointed at the fact that she is in the show, just at how they chose to depict her. I don’t want to spoil it for anyone who plans on watching the show, so I’ll just say that while a lot of the other characters treat her like she is some kind of bad-ass, we don’t get actually get to see her do anything worthy of that reputation. From what I’ve seen of her in the show so far she definitely comes across as a faux action girl, which was a little disappointing since she is one of my favorites on here. :(

  • Desmond M.

    does it say anywhere that she and marco polo were ever lovers?

  • Kate

    She and Marco Polo are rolling on the ground having sex in the first few minutes of meeting each other. Like the commenter above I too was watching the show in hopes of seeing her, and also like them, I was disappointed, yet not surprised when she appeared. For me it’s just the continuation of a trend in taking women who stand out in history and turning them into a sex-toy to lust after the main male protagonist, who in this case is incredibly mediocre. I mean, clearly, the woman who refused to marry anyone who couldn’t match her would be instantly lusting after the guy who gets his butt kicked at every turn and who she has to “rescue”. I’ve seen some people say that it probably implies that the whole “not marrying someone until they beat her” is a ruse to make her father (her father, not HER) more rich in horses. In which case just going at it like rabbits where anyone can walk over and see and freely call “Fraud!” on the whole set-up is ill-thought out. Aside from that, she does seem to be a bit of a faux action chick so far. Obviously, she’s not going to be Ms. Universe but a bit of actual muscle wouldn’t go amiss given her historically undefeated status. She gets some cool flips in. That’s about it.

    Anyway, I just saw the episode last night so it’s still a bit raw. It’s a bit of a shame, because while there have been some really gratuitous (and laughable) sex scenes lacking true purpose or context, I do really like the characters. The Empress? She’s exactly what I would imagine the wife of a Mongolian Khan to be and there is no doubt that she is all sorts of awesome with an elegant ruthlessness and a lot of wisdom. I’ll continue to watch to see where they take the characters, probably, but I’m no longer holding my breath.

  • Kate

    I, unfortunately, agree.

  • Desmond M.

    yeah,….eventually she’ll fight against other mongols, hope we see her lauded skills then.

  • Joanna Virginia

    Yurt isn’t a Russian word, it’s Turkish. Yurt means ‘home’ in pretty much all of the Turkic languages.

  • Jason Porath

    Why, you’re right! Well, it actually is Turkish, Greek, and Russian (in that order), but Turkish at its root. Shows me right, trusting other people who write in with corrections. Thanks!

  • KingofWinter

    a pretty good summary of khutulun’s life, though there are one small detail you didnt mention/got wrong/was somewhat poorly worded.

    Khutulun’s position in the mongolian army was as leader of her father heavy cavalry(basicly she commanded every mounted warrior that did not use a bow), and her rather unorthodox method of taking out enemy commanders, had her riding, snatching enemy commander by grabbing them around the neck in a iron choke around their necks and then darting back to her forces with the unfortunate commander. here you write that she “ran”, when she actually did it on horseback.

  • Jason Porath

    Cool! Thanks for writing, happy to amend — do you have a source I can look at to verify real quick, though? I thought I’d found most all the core sources on Khutulun, but I don’t remember them mentioning anything about iron choking.

  • KingofWinter

    srry, that wasnt meant literally, i meant an “iron choke” as in an choke hold strong as iron. in reality it probably looked more like this http://photos.imageevent.com/vangar/wrestlingpicturesgallery/choke%20hold%20on%20dad%20garage%20rassling%20videos%20dvd.jpg just on horseback, both in armor, and with one arm to hold her unforunate victim.

    khutulun was a rather strong woman to say the least.

  • KingofWinter

    on a more depressing note, i went back and checked where i read of khutulun, and turns out i was a bit off. she was indeed a leader of her fathers heavy cavalry, but only of one part of her fathers regiment’s. thats still rather impressive all things considered(it was a true professinal army, it was during the medieval period, and she still controlled thousands of the most disciplined warriors on the planet), but i incorrectly basicly wrote that she was the supreme leader of her father heavy cavalry, which was an overestimation based from my faulty memory. sorry about that.

  • Roger ther Shrubberer

    I’ve been reading Rejected Princesses since it’s inception, but somehow I am just now finding your post on Khutulun!!! I also happen to be a huge opera buff, and had no idea that Turandot was based on her story…

    Can’t comment of the source material, but here’s some trivia for you about the opera: Puccini died in the middle of composing it, and was explicit in his notes that it was *not* meant to be finished as a happy love story– the ending most often heard today was finished by Franco Alfano, and directly defies Puccini’s final wishes. Then again, it’s also worth noting that it was never written as a historical opera: Puccini had an affair with one of his servants, and when his wife found out she tormented the servant so much that she later committed suicide in his home. Puccini later twisted La Croix’s story into an allegory for this personal tragedy.