13 Responses to “Soraya Tarzi”

  1. D.S. Ryelle

    There are so many types of veils–so confusing! You mentioned the chadari, which Wiki says is like the burqa (you’re right). I thought you might have meant the chador (note the similar spelling!) popular in Iran. (And Pakistan, if you believe the [fictional] “Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind”, though Susanne Fisher Staples spells it without the o.) I’m pretty sure there are as many types of veils as there are countries that practice Islam!

  2. czrisher

    A tedious point but there’s a typo in the fifth footnote: “Third Angl0-Afghan War” has a zero instead of an ‘o’.

  3. czrisher

    A tedious point but there’s a typo in the fifth and thirty-sixth footnotes: “Third Angl0-Afghan War” has a zero instead of an ‘o’.

  4. Jason Porath

    Thanks, fixed! Don’t know how that happened…

  5. nader qurbankhel

    The uprise was supported by Britain,

  6. Grayson Wayman

    The languages of Afghanistan are Pashto and Dari. Farsi isn’t one of them, and highly unlikely to be the language they spoke to each other.

  7. Grayson Wayman

    Well I’ll be damned. Thank you! (I now have a new book to read to boot!)

  8. Samantha Foo

    Soraya Tarzi was a pioneer and she is a role model for all Afghani girls.

  9. Kimberley Chai

    Hello! Are these wonderful comics part of your book too? Or is the book mostly text? Thank you!

  10. Jason Porath

    Book is mostly text. I am in negotiations for a book two that hopefully will include more imagery.

  11. Kimberley Chai

    Oh that would be lovely. I am a fan of your web posts because the comics are such a fun way to tell these stories, especially to children. I really do look forward to a hardcopy book with such comics and drawings, if you do intend to produce them in future!